Willful Exaggeration Standard Remains High

For those in the construction industry, mechanics’ liens are sure to be a familiar occurrence. And, for those who have ever had a project of theirs liened, they will be aware of the tenacity of these legal devices. Mechanics’ liens are frustrating clouds on title and even though the party against whom the lien is filed rarely agrees with the amount purportedly owed, the liens themselves are difficult to remove One omnipresent option, is a claim for willful exaggeration of the lien. Section 39 of the Lien Law allows for vacataur of the lien if it has been “willfully exaggerated.” The ever-present question, however, is just what “willfully exaggerated” means.

The Courts have recently reiterated the standard for claims of willful exaggeration of mechanic’s liens. Hint: it’s still very high. In Blair v. Ferris, the Appellate Division of the Third Department once again dismissed a cause of action for willful exaggeration regarding a clearly inflated mechanic’s lien. 2017 WL 1712790.

As before, the Court made a point to state that if no exaggeration was intended, the inaccuracy simply does not matter. Willfulness truly is key. Essentially, this means that, unless it can be shown that the filer, at the time of the filing, had the intention to exaggerate the lien, a claim of willful exaggeration will fail. Considering that mechanic’s liens are meant to protect those who provide materials and/or labor against nonpayment, Courts appear to continue to take the view that there should be a heavy burden on the allegedly nonpaying party to rid itself of the lien. Allegedly wronged contractors and materialmen should not be deterred from filing liens because of the threat of a claim of willful exaggeration.